Como Zoo Arboretum
Een vraag stellen V: (Vertaald door Google) Zijn jullie in de winter open? (Origineel) Are you guys are open during the winter A: (Vertaald door Google) Ja, ze zijn open tijdens de wintermaanden. (Alle 9 van hen.) (Origineel) Yes, they are open during the winter months. (All 9 of them.) (Nog 8 antwoorden) Alle vragen bekijken (214)

Do I need reservations for Como Park Zoo & Conservatory?

Click HERE to make a reservation – The reservation process works best in Google Chrome, Firefox, or Microsoft Edge All reservation holders should check-in at the Cleveland Court Gates with their bar codes. Click HERE for a map. Some important things you’ll want to know before your visit: • Reservations are required for both members and nonmembers at this time.

  • Reservations are currently available by clicking HERE,
  • The reservation process works best in Google Chrome, Firefox, or Microsoft Edge • Due to physical distancing guidelines we are currently limiting capacity.
  • Advanced reservations are available on a first come, first serve basis.
  • Due of maintaining our capacity limits, late arrivals will be denied access.

Please plan accordingly. • Posed photography is not allowed at this time. This includes family photos, senior photos and wedding photos. Please contact our Rentals Office at 651-487-8250 or [email protected] for your available options. If you are receiving an error while making your reservations, you will need to clear your phone or computer’s cache and cookies.

What is Como Zoo?

History – Early years Como Zoo was founded in 1897 when the city of Saint Paul received a donation of three deer and provided a simple fenced in pasture for the animals. In 1902, the animal collection at Como Zoo was expanded to include animals native to Minnesota such as elk, moose, foxes, and two cebus cattle.

  • The zoo also received donations of pets, such as a parrot, two Mexican red birds and a monkey.
  • In 1915, the zoo received a donation of two bison from the future Lieutenant Governor of Minnesota Thomas Frankson,
  • Also, in 1915, the Como Park’s Marjorie McNeely Conservatory was built.
  • The conservatory was used as a warm winter home for the animals.
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In 1926, Como Zoo received the donation of an American black bear named Peggy. Her cage was built out of old iron arches already at the zoo. The 1930s brought exotic animals to the zoo. Monkey Island was built in 1932, followed by the bear grottos, and the Main Zoological building in 1936.

Along with these changes came many exotic animals from the Longfellow Gardens zoo, which closed in 1934. In the 1940s, the zoo expanded once again to include paved parking lots, a Kiddie Zoo, and a raccoon pit which later became prairie dog hill.1950s The 1950s brought even more changes to the zoo including Rabbitville which later was expanded into a Children’s Farm Zoo.

In 1955, the city officials recommended the closing of Como Zoo because the zoo and city did not have the funds to support the zoo. Soon after a Citizen Volunteer Committee was formed to help save the zoo. In 1956, through the efforts of a rich Minnesotan business man, Archie Brand’s Seal Show arrived at the zoo.

Along with this many repairs were brought to the zoo, which brought new animals such as ostriches, jaguars, seals, llamas, baboons and monkeys, In 1957, a number of endangered animals joined the zoo including Siberian tigers, gorillas, and orangutans, In 1958, Toby, a Galapagos tortoise comes to live at the zoo.

Small children were allowed to ride on Toby’s back. Also, in 1958, the first Siberian tigers to be raised successfully in captivity were born at Como Zoo. In 1959, Casey the gorilla arrived at the Como Zoo and the Como Mobile Zoo started visiting local schools.1960s and 1970s The 1960s brought what seemed to be the end of Como Zoo.

In 1966, the Metropolitan Zoo Report of the Citizen’s League decided that Como Zoo could not become a major zoo facility, so planning for the Minnesota Zoo began. With this, many people thought that Como Zoo would close, but, in 1969, the zoo built its original primate house where the one now stands, and brought in two new lowland gorillas named Don and Donna.

In 1969, the zoo was saved once again by citizens who rallied to raise funds for the zoo. In January 1972, zoo keepers were forced to shoot Whitey, a male polar bear, to save a midnight visitor who fell into the bear grotto. In 1974, the zoo’s favorite Galapagos tortoise, Toby, was moved to the Honolulu Zoo, where he still lives today.

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How did the Como Park Zoo get its bison?

History – Early years Como Zoo was founded in 1897 when the city of Saint Paul received a donation of three deer and provided a simple fenced in pasture for the animals. In 1902, the animal collection at Como Zoo was expanded to include animals native to Minnesota such as elk, moose, foxes, and two cebus cattle.

The zoo also received donations of pets, such as a parrot, two Mexican red birds and a monkey. In 1915, the zoo received a donation of two bison from the future Lieutenant Governor of Minnesota Thomas Frankson, Also, in 1915, the Como Park’s Marjorie McNeely Conservatory was built. The conservatory was used as a warm winter home for the animals.

In 1926, Como Zoo received the donation of an American black bear named Peggy. Her cage was built out of old iron arches already at the zoo. The 1930s brought exotic animals to the zoo. Monkey Island was built in 1932, followed by the bear grottos, and the Main Zoological building in 1936.

  1. Along with these changes came many exotic animals from the Longfellow Gardens zoo, which closed in 1934.
  2. In the 1940s, the zoo expanded once again to include paved parking lots, a Kiddie Zoo, and a raccoon pit which later became prairie dog hill.1950s The 1950s brought even more changes to the zoo including Rabbitville which later was expanded into a Children’s Farm Zoo.

In 1955, the city officials recommended the closing of Como Zoo because the zoo and city did not have the funds to support the zoo. Soon after a Citizen Volunteer Committee was formed to help save the zoo. In 1956, through the efforts of a rich Minnesotan business man, Archie Brand’s Seal Show arrived at the zoo.

  1. Along with this many repairs were brought to the zoo, which brought new animals such as ostriches, jaguars, seals, llamas, baboons and monkeys,
  2. In 1957, a number of endangered animals joined the zoo including Siberian tigers, gorillas, and orangutans,
  3. In 1958, Toby, a Galapagos tortoise comes to live at the zoo.
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Small children were allowed to ride on Toby’s back. Also, in 1958, the first Siberian tigers to be raised successfully in captivity were born at Como Zoo. In 1959, Casey the gorilla arrived at the Como Zoo and the Como Mobile Zoo started visiting local schools.1960s and 1970s The 1960s brought what seemed to be the end of Como Zoo.

In 1966, the Metropolitan Zoo Report of the Citizen’s League decided that Como Zoo could not become a major zoo facility, so planning for the Minnesota Zoo began. With this, many people thought that Como Zoo would close, but, in 1969, the zoo built its original primate house where the one now stands, and brought in two new lowland gorillas named Don and Donna.

In 1969, the zoo was saved once again by citizens who rallied to raise funds for the zoo. In January 1972, zoo keepers were forced to shoot Whitey, a male polar bear, to save a midnight visitor who fell into the bear grotto. In 1974, the zoo’s favorite Galapagos tortoise, Toby, was moved to the Honolulu Zoo, where he still lives today.

Are there new varieties of poinsettias at Como Park Zoo?

como keeps you learning – Como Park Zoo & Conservatory is free and open to newcomers and frequent visitors alike all year long. Our mission is to inspire our public to value the presence of living things in our lives. With a strong focus on conservation and serving over 2 million visitors annually, our expert staff is dedicated to the wellbeing of the many plants and animals that live here.